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Indian Flint Knapping
Jan 24, 2023 00:20:03   #
Robert J Samples Loc: Round Rock, Texas
 
The farm where I was born was located less than half mile from Mountain Creek. At the time, it belonged to my Grandfather Cannon. Several years later, we had moved on and Sam Cannon, my uncle lived there with his family.
Now Uncle Sam Cannon and his wife Jesse, had a large family of eight children.
Two of the boys closest to my age were Pete and Joseph. I always enjoyed visiting but was never sure it would be a safe trip. On one visit they asked me if I would like to see a nest of Mountain Boomers?
Now of course, for a six- or seven-year-old boy the desire to explore is quite strong so I said yes.

(Mountain Boomer lizards can grow to about 14inches in length and are brightly colored. They are the state lizard of Oklahoma. They are not poisonous but are very intolerant of anyone coming around and willing to attack. Their scientific name is Crotaphytus Colaris, or collared Lizard.)

We then went trooping off behind the barn out to a dry gulley that connected to Mountain Creek about a half mile away. When we got close, I could see these lizards and they didn’t act friendly, in fact some immediately jumped down from the rock pile they considered home and began to chase us.

For a very impressionable kid of six or seven, this was really frightening. They came toward us running on just their back legs! And a far as I could tell they could run as fast as I could, which made me even more afraid of them.
My cousins had told me all kinds of wild attributes of these lizards, that they were poisonous and such, so I was suitably scared to being chased by them.
Only years later did I learn most of what I had been told was false.

One year while we lived in Houston, I read in the newspaper there would be a snake show, or a hepatology show, and we decided to go since I wanted to learn more about Mountain Boomers. Well, I looked all around for them but had no success of finding any Mountain Boomers.

I finally ask one of the exhibitors about them and was told he didn’t know anything about them but referred me to another exhibitor. I go over and ask this expert why there were no Mountain Boomers being exhibited. He said this lizard was very anti-social and often even died if taken into captivity. They preferred to live in some remote rocky area far from any human contact.

Also, at this farm, or more accurately, across the road was a barren field that sloped down toward Mountain creek. My cousins told me that after a hard rain, they would go over there and search for arrow heads. It seems that an Indian tribe lived in this area in earlier times and used this field as a place to make arrow points. In my visit, I could see there were a few scattered pieces of rock, but never found any arrowheads. I don’t know whether these Native Americans had imported the flint to work on or found it locally.
There was no question this area was inhabited by a tribe, known as the Taovaya, a subgroup of the Wichita tribes. They abandoned the area due to the disease of smallpox killing about half the population, so the rest moved away before any white settlers arrived in around the 1870s.

It was only when graves were discovered in the area did settlers realize later that there had been a thriving population of Native Americans living along and close to the Red River. Just Sayin…RJS

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Jan 24, 2023 04:49:10   #
bknecht Loc: Northeast pa
 
Interesting RJS, thanks for the read.

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Jan 24, 2023 08:36:31   #
Hogwaller Loc: Garrison Texas
 
Interesting read, thanks for sharing

Reply
 
 
Jan 25, 2023 01:55:52   #
Whitey Loc: Southeast ohio
 
Robert J Samples wrote:
The farm where I was born was located less than half mile from Mountain Creek. At the time, it belonged to my Grandfather Cannon. Several years later, we had moved on and Sam Cannon, my uncle lived there with his family.
Now Uncle Sam Cannon and his wife Jesse, had a large family of eight children.
Two of the boys closest to my age were Pete and Joseph. I always enjoyed visiting but was never sure it would be a safe trip. On one visit they asked me if I would like to see a nest of Mountain Boomers?
Now of course, for a six- or seven-year-old boy the desire to explore is quite strong so I said yes.

(Mountain Boomer lizards can grow to about 14inches in length and are brightly colored. They are the state lizard of Oklahoma. They are not poisonous but are very intolerant of anyone coming around and willing to attack. Their scientific name is Crotaphytus Colaris, or collared Lizard.)

We then went trooping off behind the barn out to a dry gulley that connected to Mountain Creek about a half mile away. When we got close, I could see these lizards and they didn’t act friendly, in fact some immediately jumped down from the rock pile they considered home and began to chase us.

For a very impressionable kid of six or seven, this was really frightening. They came toward us running on just their back legs! And a far as I could tell they could run as fast as I could, which made me even more afraid of them.
My cousins had told me all kinds of wild attributes of these lizards, that they were poisonous and such, so I was suitably scared to being chased by them.
Only years later did I learn most of what I had been told was false.

One year while we lived in Houston, I read in the newspaper there would be a snake show, or a hepatology show, and we decided to go since I wanted to learn more about Mountain Boomers. Well, I looked all around for them but had no success of finding any Mountain Boomers.

I finally ask one of the exhibitors about them and was told he didn’t know anything about them but referred me to another exhibitor. I go over and ask this expert why there were no Mountain Boomers being exhibited. He said this lizard was very anti-social and often even died if taken into captivity. They preferred to live in some remote rocky area far from any human contact.

Also, at this farm, or more accurately, across the road was a barren field that sloped down toward Mountain creek. My cousins told me that after a hard rain, they would go over there and search for arrow heads. It seems that an Indian tribe lived in this area in earlier times and used this field as a place to make arrow points. In my visit, I could see there were a few scattered pieces of rock, but never found any arrowheads. I don’t know whether these Native Americans had imported the flint to work on or found it locally.
There was no question this area was inhabited by a tribe, known as the Taovaya, a subgroup of the Wichita tribes. They abandoned the area due to the disease of smallpox killing about half the population, so the rest moved away before any white settlers arrived in around the 1870s.

It was only when graves were discovered in the area did settlers realize later that there had been a thriving population of Native Americans living along and close to the Red River. Just Sayin…RJS
The farm where I was born was located less than ha... (show quote)


Very interesting Robert 👍 isn't it funny how cousins can get ya stirred up lol. Thanks for sharing 👍

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Jan 25, 2023 09:57:38   #
HenryG Loc: Falmouth Cape Cod Massachusetts
 
Robert J Samples wrote:
The farm where I was born was located less than half mile from Mountain Creek. At the time, it belonged to my Grandfather Cannon. Several years later, we had moved on and Sam Cannon, my uncle lived there with his family.
Now Uncle Sam Cannon and his wife Jesse, had a large family of eight children.
Two of the boys closest to my age were Pete and Joseph. I always enjoyed visiting but was never sure it would be a safe trip. On one visit they asked me if I would like to see a nest of Mountain Boomers?
Now of course, for a six- or seven-year-old boy the desire to explore is quite strong so I said yes.

(Mountain Boomer lizards can grow to about 14inches in length and are brightly colored. They are the state lizard of Oklahoma. They are not poisonous but are very intolerant of anyone coming around and willing to attack. Their scientific name is Crotaphytus Colaris, or collared Lizard.)

We then went trooping off behind the barn out to a dry gulley that connected to Mountain Creek about a half mile away. When we got close, I could see these lizards and they didn’t act friendly, in fact some immediately jumped down from the rock pile they considered home and began to chase us.

For a very impressionable kid of six or seven, this was really frightening. They came toward us running on just their back legs! And a far as I could tell they could run as fast as I could, which made me even more afraid of them.
My cousins had told me all kinds of wild attributes of these lizards, that they were poisonous and such, so I was suitably scared to being chased by them.
Only years later did I learn most of what I had been told was false.

One year while we lived in Houston, I read in the newspaper there would be a snake show, or a hepatology show, and we decided to go since I wanted to learn more about Mountain Boomers. Well, I looked all around for them but had no success of finding any Mountain Boomers.

I finally ask one of the exhibitors about them and was told he didn’t know anything about them but referred me to another exhibitor. I go over and ask this expert why there were no Mountain Boomers being exhibited. He said this lizard was very anti-social and often even died if taken into captivity. They preferred to live in some remote rocky area far from any human contact.

Also, at this farm, or more accurately, across the road was a barren field that sloped down toward Mountain creek. My cousins told me that after a hard rain, they would go over there and search for arrow heads. It seems that an Indian tribe lived in this area in earlier times and used this field as a place to make arrow points. In my visit, I could see there were a few scattered pieces of rock, but never found any arrowheads. I don’t know whether these Native Americans had imported the flint to work on or found it locally.
There was no question this area was inhabited by a tribe, known as the Taovaya, a subgroup of the Wichita tribes. They abandoned the area due to the disease of smallpox killing about half the population, so the rest moved away before any white settlers arrived in around the 1870s.

It was only when graves were discovered in the area did settlers realize later that there had been a thriving population of Native Americans living along and close to the Red River. Just Sayin…RJS
The farm where I was born was located less than ha... (show quote)

Nice story Mr Samples thanks for sharing 🇺🇸🙂👍

Reply
Jan 25, 2023 18:46:13   #
The Outcast Loc: NE Michigan
 
Robert J Samples wrote:
The farm where I was born was located less than half mile from Mountain Creek. At the time, it belonged to my Grandfather Cannon. Several years later, we had moved on and Sam Cannon, my uncle lived there with his family.
Now Uncle Sam Cannon and his wife Jesse, had a large family of eight children.
Two of the boys closest to my age were Pete and Joseph. I always enjoyed visiting but was never sure it would be a safe trip. On one visit they asked me if I would like to see a nest of Mountain Boomers?
Now of course, for a six- or seven-year-old boy the desire to explore is quite strong so I said yes.

(Mountain Boomer lizards can grow to about 14inches in length and are brightly colored. They are the state lizard of Oklahoma. They are not poisonous but are very intolerant of anyone coming around and willing to attack. Their scientific name is Crotaphytus Colaris, or collared Lizard.)

We then went trooping off behind the barn out to a dry gulley that connected to Mountain Creek about a half mile away. When we got close, I could see these lizards and they didn’t act friendly, in fact some immediately jumped down from the rock pile they considered home and began to chase us.

For a very impressionable kid of six or seven, this was really frightening. They came toward us running on just their back legs! And a far as I could tell they could run as fast as I could, which made me even more afraid of them.
My cousins had told me all kinds of wild attributes of these lizards, that they were poisonous and such, so I was suitably scared to being chased by them.
Only years later did I learn most of what I had been told was false.

One year while we lived in Houston, I read in the newspaper there would be a snake show, or a hepatology show, and we decided to go since I wanted to learn more about Mountain Boomers. Well, I looked all around for them but had no success of finding any Mountain Boomers.

I finally ask one of the exhibitors about them and was told he didn’t know anything about them but referred me to another exhibitor. I go over and ask this expert why there were no Mountain Boomers being exhibited. He said this lizard was very anti-social and often even died if taken into captivity. They preferred to live in some remote rocky area far from any human contact.

Also, at this farm, or more accurately, across the road was a barren field that sloped down toward Mountain creek. My cousins told me that after a hard rain, they would go over there and search for arrow heads. It seems that an Indian tribe lived in this area in earlier times and used this field as a place to make arrow points. In my visit, I could see there were a few scattered pieces of rock, but never found any arrowheads. I don’t know whether these Native Americans had imported the flint to work on or found it locally.
There was no question this area was inhabited by a tribe, known as the Taovaya, a subgroup of the Wichita tribes. They abandoned the area due to the disease of smallpox killing about half the population, so the rest moved away before any white settlers arrived in around the 1870s.

It was only when graves were discovered in the area did settlers realize later that there had been a thriving population of Native Americans living along and close to the Red River. Just Sayin…RJS
The farm where I was born was located less than ha... (show quote)


Threat story Mr. Samples! Keep ‘em coming!

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