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Do You like to cook and have plants?
Nov 22, 2022 20:42:19   #
Kerry Hansen Loc: Bremerton, WA
 
To those who like to cook, you know that many recipes call for a couple of Bay Leafs in that soup or what ever to add seasoning. I got my Bay Laurel Plant about 20 years ago and have it in a nice Large pot on my deck. The only extra care I have to give it besides water and an occasional bit of organic fertilizer is to protect it from freezing. I have done it and it thrives as a approx 3-4' little shrub/tree. So when ever a recipe calls for Bay Leaf I just step outside and pluck them from the bush!

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Nov 22, 2022 21:35:46   #
Jarheadfishnfool Loc: Tulare County, Ca.
 
Kerry Hansen wrote:
To those who like to cook, you know that many recipes call for a couple of Bay Leafs in that soup or what ever to add seasoning. I got my Bay Laurel Plant about 20 years ago and have it in a nice Large pot on my deck. The only extra care I have to give it besides water and an occasional bit of organic fertilizer is to protect it from freezing. I have done it and it thrives as a approx 3-4' little shrub/tree. So when ever a recipe calls for Bay Leaf I just step outside and pluck them from the bush!
To those who like to cook, you know that many reci... (show quote)

You're right Kerry, but I also talk to mine !All good live plants and Fruit trees,, in return they give back,🙏🌿

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Nov 22, 2022 23:05:41   #
DC Loc: Washington state
 
Kerry Hansen wrote:
To those who like to cook, you know that many recipes call for a couple of Bay Leafs in that soup or what ever to add seasoning. I got my Bay Laurel Plant about 20 years ago and have it in a nice Large pot on my deck. The only extra care I have to give it besides water and an occasional bit of organic fertilizer is to protect it from freezing. I have done it and it thrives as a approx 3-4' little shrub/tree. So when ever a recipe calls for Bay Leaf I just step outside and pluck them from the bush!
To those who like to cook, you know that many reci... (show quote)


does it lose it's leaves in the winter and what do you have to do to protect it from freezing. I have grown rosemary, sage, basil, thyme in my garden but they die off when it freezes but never thought about trying to grow a Bay Laurel plant for some reason I thought they were a big tree I will have to look into it next spring.

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Nov 23, 2022 11:53:22   #
smitty Loc: maine
 
Kerry Hansen wrote:
To those who like to cook, you know that many recipes call for a couple of Bay Leafs in that soup or what ever to add seasoning. I got my Bay Laurel Plant about 20 years ago and have it in a nice Large pot on my deck. The only extra care I have to give it besides water and an occasional bit of organic fertilizer is to protect it from freezing. I have done it and it thrives as a approx 3-4' little shrub/tree. So when ever a recipe calls for Bay Leaf I just step outside and pluck them from the bush!
To those who like to cook, you know that many reci... (show quote)


good to know, we use it a lot. wonder if it could live in maine. how cold does it get out ur way

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Nov 23, 2022 11:55:38   #
Kerry Hansen Loc: Bremerton, WA
 
DC wrote:
does it lose it's leaves in the winter and what do you have to do to protect it from freezing. I have grown rosemary, sage, basil, thyme in my garden but they die off when it freezes but never thought about trying to grow a Bay Laurel plant for some reason I thought they were a big tree I will have to look into it next spring.


NO

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Nov 23, 2022 12:11:24   #
Kerry Hansen Loc: Bremerton, WA
 
smitty wrote:
good to know, we use it a lot. wonder if it could live in maine. how cold does it get out ur way


Hardest about 10-20. Last year I bought bought one of those heat tapes that keep pipes from freezing. It does not turn on until the temp gets down close to freezing so no waste power. Wrapped it around the pot. I put a light weight cover over it and have also used a mechanics drop light that I sit on top of pot under the shrub. I used to bring it inside when it was predicted to get cold, but after reaching 80, it got too much for me to tussle with.

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Nov 23, 2022 14:14:19   #
USAF Major Loc: Sea Bright, NJ
 
DC wrote:
does it lose it's leaves in the winter and what do you have to do to protect it from freezing. I have grown rosemary, sage, basil, thyme in my garden but they die off when it freezes but never thought about trying to grow a Bay Laurel plant for some reason I thought they were a big tree I will have to look into it next spring.


Rosemary should make it through the winter. It survives here in NJ. Maybe your pot is too small and the dirt freezes?

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Nov 23, 2022 14:37:22   #
DC Loc: Washington state
 
USAF Major wrote:
Rosemary should make it through the winter. It survives here in NJ. Maybe your pot is too small and the dirt freezes?


actually it was in the ground and lived through a couple winters but finally had enough cold and died. I have heard there are different kinds that are hardier than othets

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Nov 23, 2022 17:48:24   #
kandydisbar Loc: West Orange, NJ
 
Kerry Hansen wrote:
To those who like to cook, you know that many recipes call for a couple of Bay Leafs in that soup or what ever to add seasoning. I got my Bay Laurel Plant about 20 years ago and have it in a nice Large pot on my deck. The only extra care I have to give it besides water and an occasional bit of organic fertilizer is to protect it from freezing. I have done it and it thrives as a approx 3-4' little shrub/tree. So when ever a recipe calls for Bay Leaf I just step outside and pluck them from the bush!
To those who like to cook, you know that many reci... (show quote)


I have many herbs I bring inside for Winter. Never tried Bay but I will certainly look into it. [Not Baywatch, lol] Thanks and Happy Thanksgiving

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Nov 23, 2022 22:50:37   #
Marshall Jose Loc: PA 18074
 
My sage, thyme, and oregano were still thriving in their grow boxes yesterday when I needed herbs for Thanksgiving. Also rosemary in large pots last through winter here in SE PA. BTW, I didn't plant those herbs in the grow box last spring. They just spontaneously sprouted from 2020 planting

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Nov 23, 2022 23:07:34   #
Lockman54 Loc: Alliance,Oh
 
Kerry Hansen wrote:
To those who like to cook, you know that many recipes call for a couple of Bay Leafs in that soup or what ever to add seasoning. I got my Bay Laurel Plant about 20 years ago and have it in a nice Large pot on my deck. The only extra care I have to give it besides water and an occasional bit of organic fertilizer is to protect it from freezing. I have done it and it thrives as a approx 3-4' little shrub/tree. So when ever a recipe calls for Bay Leaf I just step outside and pluck them from the bush!
To those who like to cook, you know that many reci... (show quote)


Just have to remember that they are for flavoring or seasoning. Once they are cooked you take them back out. You're not supposed to eat the leaves as they can cut you up inside.

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Nov 23, 2022 23:48:36   #
Sinker Rig Loc: Tampa area
 
Kerry Hansen wrote:
To those who like to cook, you know that many recipes call for a couple of Bay Leafs in that soup or what ever to add seasoning. I got my Bay Laurel Plant about 20 years ago and have it in a nice Large pot on my deck. The only extra care I have to give it besides water and an occasional bit of organic fertilizer is to protect it from freezing. I have done it and it thrives as a approx 3-4' little shrub/tree. So when ever a recipe calls for Bay Leaf I just step outside and pluck them from the bush!
To those who like to cook, you know that many reci... (show quote)

Well congratulations Kerry, it was so thoughtful of you to share your bay leaf story with us idiots

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Nov 24, 2022 09:57:56   #
kandydisbar Loc: West Orange, NJ
 
Marshall Jose wrote:
My sage, thyme, and oregano were still thriving in their grow boxes yesterday when I needed herbs for Thanksgiving. Also rosemary in large pots last through winter here in SE PA. BTW, I didn't plant those herbs in the grow box last spring. They just spontaneously sprouted from 2020 planting


Isn't it wonderful?!!

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Nov 24, 2022 23:58:17   #
Marshall Jose Loc: PA 18074
 
For sure. I'll have to stop being lazy and plant more next spring. These plastic grow boxes are about as easy as it gets. Fill with planting soil, insert plants, water and cover soil with burlap. Water goes in the bottom receptacle once a week.
Once I wanted to make a simple parsley and boiled potato dish and ran out of parsley. I used sage instead. Turned out great.

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