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Comanche Marker Trees in Texas
Nov 22, 2021 21:05:58   #
Robert J Samples Loc: Round Rock, Texas
 
Hunters and fishermen could easily pass by one of these historical marker trees and not recognize what it means or signified, but this would have been a serious trail marker of great significance to Comanches who might be traveling hundreds even thousands of miles from their base camp.

No one has ever mentioned whether there was a marker tree near the Parker Fort and because of this location of a family’s effort to establish themselves on the Texas frontier may have led to their massacre. Cynthia Ann Parker was a young girl and one who survived capture by the Comanches became the wife of Peta Nocona and bore him three children. The most famous of their children was Quanah Parker, also chief of the Comanches and a skilled deceiver of all the punitive expeditions sent to kill or capture the Comanche raiding parties.

The California Crossing Indian Marker Tree, located on the grounds of the National Guard Armory in Dallas, likely signaled a low water crossing point along the Trinity River.

American Indians once used trees like highway signposts, bending and securing young saplings to mark important landmarks and resources. The Texas Historic Tree Coalition is working to identify, document, and officially recognize these culturally modified trees, before they disappear from the landscape - and the state's historical record.
An Indian marker tree is one that was purposely bent over and secured in that position when it was small, eventually taking on an unusual appearance as it matured. Some tribes used binding ties made with a thong of animal hide, which is where the term "thong tree" originated. The Comanche, who claimed areas of North, Central, and West Texas as tribal territory, secured a sapling with rope made of yucca and weighted it with rocks. According to Comanche Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Jimmy W. Arterberry, the plant fiber was more widely used because animal hide was a valuable resource.

IDENTIFYING INDIAN MARKER TREES
Why do so few people today know about these cultural marker trees? The most likely reason is that American Indians did not openly share information about their way of life with outsiders. Instead, they handed down customs and practices as part of their oral tradition. In time, as elders passed away, the stories of these special trees and the roles they played within a tribe's culture were lost.

The lack of public awareness and an appreciation for significant trees, including those that guided American Indians, prompted the establishment in 1995 of the Texas Historic Tree Coalition (TxHTC), originally the Dallas Historic Tree Coalition. Within the organization, there is a group that studies and was the first to be recognized in 1996. research Indian marker trees.

A genuine marker tree is a rate find--only six have been documented in the North Texas area and officially recognized...A pecan with a long arching bow in the trunk, located in an East Dallas Park, Just Sayin…RJS

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Nov 22, 2021 21:23:06   #
CamT Loc: La Porte, Texas
 
Robert J Samples wrote:
Hunters and fishermen could easily pass by one of these historical marker trees and not recognize what it means or signified, but this would have been a serious trail marker of great significance to Comanches who might be traveling hundreds even thousands of miles from their base camp.

No one has ever mentioned whether there was a marker tree near the Parker Fort and because of this location of a family’s effort to establish themselves on the Texas frontier may have led to their massacre. Cynthia Ann Parker was a young girl and one who survived capture by the Comanches became the wife of Peta Nocona and bore him three children. The most famous of their children was Quanah Parker, also chief of the Comanches and a skilled deceiver of all the punitive expeditions sent to kill or capture the Comanche raiding parties.

The California Crossing Indian Marker Tree, located on the grounds of the National Guard Armory in Dallas, likely signaled a low water crossing point along the Trinity River.

American Indians once used trees like highway signposts, bending and securing young saplings to mark important landmarks and resources. The Texas Historic Tree Coalition is working to identify, document, and officially recognize these culturally modified trees, before they disappear from the landscape - and the state's historical record.
An Indian marker tree is one that was purposely bent over and secured in that position when it was small, eventually taking on an unusual appearance as it matured. Some tribes used binding ties made with a thong of animal hide, which is where the term "thong tree" originated. The Comanche, who claimed areas of North, Central, and West Texas as tribal territory, secured a sapling with rope made of yucca and weighted it with rocks. According to Comanche Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Jimmy W. Arterberry, the plant fiber was more widely used because animal hide was a valuable resource.

IDENTIFYING INDIAN MARKER TREES
Why do so few people today know about these cultural marker trees? The most likely reason is that American Indians did not openly share information about their way of life with outsiders. Instead, they handed down customs and practices as part of their oral tradition. In time, as elders passed away, the stories of these special trees and the roles they played within a tribe's culture were lost.

The lack of public awareness and an appreciation for significant trees, including those that guided American Indians, prompted the establishment in 1995 of the Texas Historic Tree Coalition (TxHTC), originally the Dallas Historic Tree Coalition. Within the organization, there is a group that studies and was the first to be recognized in 1996. research Indian marker trees.

A genuine marker tree is a rate find--only six have been documented in the North Texas area and officially recognized...A pecan with a long arching bow in the trunk, located in an East Dallas Park, Just Sayin…RJS
Hunters and fishermen could easily pass by one of ... (show quote)

Thanks Robert that is some cool historical information

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Nov 23, 2021 05:38:23   #
Billy awesome Loc: New hampshire
 
Never knew. Thanks for sharing your knowledge

Reply
 
 
Nov 23, 2021 06:41:42   #
plumbob Loc: New Windsor Maryland
 
Robert J Samples wrote:
Hunters and fishermen could easily pass by one of these historical marker trees and not recognize what it means or signified, but this would have been a serious trail marker of great significance to Comanches who might be traveling hundreds even thousands of miles from their base camp.

No one has ever mentioned whether there was a marker tree near the Parker Fort and because of this location of a family’s effort to establish themselves on the Texas frontier may have led to their massacre. Cynthia Ann Parker was a young girl and one who survived capture by the Comanches became the wife of Peta Nocona and bore him three children. The most famous of their children was Quanah Parker, also chief of the Comanches and a skilled deceiver of all the punitive expeditions sent to kill or capture the Comanche raiding parties.

The California Crossing Indian Marker Tree, located on the grounds of the National Guard Armory in Dallas, likely signaled a low water crossing point along the Trinity River.

American Indians once used trees like highway signposts, bending and securing young saplings to mark important landmarks and resources. The Texas Historic Tree Coalition is working to identify, document, and officially recognize these culturally modified trees, before they disappear from the landscape - and the state's historical record.
An Indian marker tree is one that was purposely bent over and secured in that position when it was small, eventually taking on an unusual appearance as it matured. Some tribes used binding ties made with a thong of animal hide, which is where the term "thong tree" originated. The Comanche, who claimed areas of North, Central, and West Texas as tribal territory, secured a sapling with rope made of yucca and weighted it with rocks. According to Comanche Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Jimmy W. Arterberry, the plant fiber was more widely used because animal hide was a valuable resource.

IDENTIFYING INDIAN MARKER TREES
Why do so few people today know about these cultural marker trees? The most likely reason is that American Indians did not openly share information about their way of life with outsiders. Instead, they handed down customs and practices as part of their oral tradition. In time, as elders passed away, the stories of these special trees and the roles they played within a tribe's culture were lost.

The lack of public awareness and an appreciation for significant trees, including those that guided American Indians, prompted the establishment in 1995 of the Texas Historic Tree Coalition (TxHTC), originally the Dallas Historic Tree Coalition. Within the organization, there is a group that studies and was the first to be recognized in 1996. research Indian marker trees.

A genuine marker tree is a rate find--only six have been documented in the North Texas area and officially recognized...A pecan with a long arching bow in the trunk, located in an East Dallas Park, Just Sayin…RJS
Hunters and fishermen could easily pass by one of ... (show quote)


You are spot on with the tree info RJ. Where i lived in NC was a known native American living location at a time in history before the settlers came. Many of artifacts were found along the waters edge and on my property was such a tree.

Never knew what it signified and that it was near a pine tar pit was always a odd spot to be located. So much history still visible if we would only open our eyes and appreciate.

Reply
Nov 23, 2021 09:26:31   #
Frank romero Loc: Clovis, NM
 
Robert J Samples wrote:
Hunters and fishermen could easily pass by one of these historical marker trees and not recognize what it means or signified, but this would have been a serious trail marker of great significance to Comanches who might be traveling hundreds even thousands of miles from their base camp.

No one has ever mentioned whether there was a marker tree near the Parker Fort and because of this location of a family’s effort to establish themselves on the Texas frontier may have led to their massacre. Cynthia Ann Parker was a young girl and one who survived capture by the Comanches became the wife of Peta Nocona and bore him three children. The most famous of their children was Quanah Parker, also chief of the Comanches and a skilled deceiver of all the punitive expeditions sent to kill or capture the Comanche raiding parties.

The California Crossing Indian Marker Tree, located on the grounds of the National Guard Armory in Dallas, likely signaled a low water crossing point along the Trinity River.

American Indians once used trees like highway signposts, bending and securing young saplings to mark important landmarks and resources. The Texas Historic Tree Coalition is working to identify, document, and officially recognize these culturally modified trees, before they disappear from the landscape - and the state's historical record.
An Indian marker tree is one that was purposely bent over and secured in that position when it was small, eventually taking on an unusual appearance as it matured. Some tribes used binding ties made with a thong of animal hide, which is where the term "thong tree" originated. The Comanche, who claimed areas of North, Central, and West Texas as tribal territory, secured a sapling with rope made of yucca and weighted it with rocks. According to Comanche Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Jimmy W. Arterberry, the plant fiber was more widely used because animal hide was a valuable resource.

IDENTIFYING INDIAN MARKER TREES
Why do so few people today know about these cultural marker trees? The most likely reason is that American Indians did not openly share information about their way of life with outsiders. Instead, they handed down customs and practices as part of their oral tradition. In time, as elders passed away, the stories of these special trees and the roles they played within a tribe's culture were lost.

The lack of public awareness and an appreciation for significant trees, including those that guided American Indians, prompted the establishment in 1995 of the Texas Historic Tree Coalition (TxHTC), originally the Dallas Historic Tree Coalition. Within the organization, there is a group that studies and was the first to be recognized in 1996. research Indian marker trees.

A genuine marker tree is a rate find--only six have been documented in the North Texas area and officially recognized...A pecan with a long arching bow in the trunk, located in an East Dallas Park, Just Sayin…RJS
Hunters and fishermen could easily pass by one of ... (show quote)

This is interesting to know. Things like this would have made history lessons better in school.

Reply
Nov 23, 2021 09:27:48   #
fishyaker Loc: NW Michigan (Lower Peninsula)
 
plumbob wrote:
You are spot on with the tree info RJ. Where i lived in NC was a known native American living location at a time in history before the settlers came. Many of artifacts were found along the waters edge and on my property was such a tree.

Never knew what it signified and that it was near a pine tar pit was always a odd spot to be located. So much history still visible if we would only open our eyes and appreciate.


Very cool plumb...a rare piece of history right in your old backyard!

Robert...now I'm gonna be on the lookout whenever I spend time thrashing thru the woods in the future! Great tidbit from history...thanks for the enlightening story!

Reply
Nov 23, 2021 14:15:32   #
USAF Major Loc: Sea Bright, NJ
 
it is a good day when you learn something new! Thanks Bob.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO ALL!

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Nov 23, 2021 16:01:28   #
Apollo Loc: Grand Lake, Ok
 
Thank you for posting this, as I have never heard of marker trees and how they were used. I have often heard the phrase "tribal knowledge" and your article is an excellent example of how important information was passed on.

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Nov 23, 2021 20:14:04   #
Robert J Samples Loc: Round Rock, Texas
 
Ladies and Gentlemen: This is only one tiny bit of information that storytellers can preserve and pass on to their descendants! All of you need to think carefully about your obligation to pass on your family's history to your children and grandchildren, otherwise, it will be lost forever! Don't shortchange them. Just Sayin...RJS

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