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Lake Vermillion fishing
Jul 20, 2021 13:49:35   #
Tom Wasz
 
I'm going to L.V. for the first time and staying at Spring Bay resort and was wondering if anyone could tell me the best areas to fish. We will be targeting Bass and Crappie/panfish. I not asking for honey holes just an area. I wouldn't be adverse to trailering to another part of the lake if it was smarter to drive the road instead of the water. Also are there any restaurants in the close vicinity to Cook. Will be there from August 7 - 14th, this year.

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Jul 20, 2021 14:06:18   #
FinFisherman Loc: Born in Ohio - 40 yrs Florida- Clearwater,Fl
 
Tom Wasz wrote:
I'm going to L.V. for the first time and staying at Spring Bay resort and was wondering if anyone could tell me the best areas to fish. We will be targeting Bass and Crappie/panfish. I not asking for honey holes just an area. I wouldn't be adverse to trailering to another part of the lake if it was smarter to drive the road instead of the water. Also are there any restaurants in the close vicinity to Cook. Will be there from August 7 - 14th, this year.


You need to help us out. What state are you in or fishing. I know of a lake vermillion in Ohio. The fishing stage.com covers the world tho most of us are in the USA.

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Jul 20, 2021 14:28:29   #
nutz4fish Loc: Colchester, CT
 
L.V. = Las Vegas ?

Reply
 
 
Jul 20, 2021 14:31:02   #
FourchonLa. Loc: Fourchon Louisiana, South Louisiana
 
nutz4fish wrote:
L.V. = Las Vegas ?


LV- Lake Vermilion? Spring Bay Resort is in Minnesota. At least that’s what popped up during the search.

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Jul 20, 2021 14:42:32   #
Rock Hound Loc: Southeast Minnesota
 
Lake Vermilion and Cook are in Northeast Minnesota.

I am not familiar with Spring Bay, but stayed at Pehrson's (same western end of the lake) about 15 years ago with my wife and kids. It is a beautiful Canadian Shield lake . . . very, very scenic.

We didn't do great on walleyes when we stayed there in July, but we crushed the smallmouth on Senkos wacky style and did very well on perch and big bluegills to. We fished all of the islands and rocky shorelines on the western end of the lake (the lake is HUGE). There are also some weedy areas, and we had some luck on the edge of the weed lines too, especially for panfish. We didn't target crappies.

I did have a buddy come back from Lake Vermilion last weekend. He said they did well on bass, but pretty poor on walleyes. I think if you are targeting smallmouth, you are in for a very fun trip!

It is also one of the best Muskie lakes in Minnesota, so you never know what will happen.

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Jul 20, 2021 20:19:25   #
Tom Wasz
 
Thanks for the info The lake Vermillion in Mn. is where I am going.

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Jul 21, 2021 14:38:45   #
Ron620DVS Loc: Guntersville Alabama
 
Tom Wasz wrote:
I'm going to L.V. for the first time and staying at Spring Bay resort and was wondering if anyone could tell me the best areas to fish. We will be targeting Bass and Crappie/panfish. I not asking for honey holes just an area. I wouldn't be adverse to trailering to another part of the lake if it was smarter to drive the road instead of the water. Also are there any restaurants in the close vicinity to Cook. Will be there from August 7 - 14th, this year.



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Lake Vermilion Fishing Map;

https://www.fishinghotspots.com/e1/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=270



Fishing is world-class on Lake Vermilion. With 40,000 acres, 365 islands, and 1200 miles of shoreline, it has something for everyone. Spring Bay offers top-notch guide services for our guests.

Home > Guide Service;

Our guide service is intended to be a service for our guests. Steve has been fishing Lake Vermilion all of his life. He is on the lake daily keeping up with the fish movement, seasonal patterns, and locations. If you are a guest, we will mark your lake map with all the hot-spots for the type of fish you are looking to catch. The required deposit is $100 for guide service.

Shore lunch is available for any 6-8 hour trips and is $15/per person.

Please call in advance and talk to Steve if you wish to schedule a guided trip. He is always available to our guests for advice on fish location, different techniques, lake navigation, and any other assistance you may need. As your host, he intends to help you locate and catch fish. Feel free to call if you have further questions regarding the guide service.

Directions to Spring Bay;

Approximately 3 1/2 hours north of the Twin Cities Area.

Take Interstate 35 north to Cloquet. Take Highway 33 north from Cloquet until it connects with Highway 53 north. Take 53 north until you get to Cook.

Take a right on Highway 24 (by the log American Bank) in Cook, continue across railroad tracks (veer to left) and continue on Highway 24 (approximately 8 miles) until you arrive at Spring Bay Resort (located directly off of Highway 24).

Please click on links for additional information, Thank you

About Us;

https://springbayresort.com/about-us/

Boat and Pontoons for Rent;

https://springbayresort.com/boat-rentals/

https://springbayresort.com/partners/

https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/licenses/online-sales.html

Fishing information;

Thus, when you come to Vermilion, spend some time casting and looking at areas with large main lake weed beds along shorelines or around islands, and at rock-and-boulder reefs and island complexes with immediate access to deep water.

Fishing Patterns Of Lake Vermilion;

Walleyes are the most popular species for our fishing guests, and with good reason. Lake Vermilion has an excellent walleye population, with fish of all sizes present in good numbers. They put up a good fight on light line, and make for a tasty shore lunch or evening meal accompanied by fried potatoes and onions, pork & beans and canned fruit for dessert.

In spring, walleyes spawn either in incoming rivers with rocky shoals, or atop main lake rock flats swept by wind and current, with water temperatures in the 40 Fs. Many fish tend to linger around such spots until the water temperature reaches about 55 F. Casting a ¼-ounce jig tipped with a minnow or soft bait, swimming the jig or lift-dropping it on and off bottom back to the boat, is often all you need to catch fish at this time. As an alternative, try casting or longline trolling 4- to 5-inch minnow baits through the shallows, targeting about 4 to 8 feet. As post spawn walleyes disperse.

As post spawn walleyes disperse back into the main lake, look for them along the first major points, islands or rock reefs adjacent to their spawning sites, initially focusing your efforts at about the 10- to 20-foot level. Vertically jig jig & minnow combos, or backtroll live bait rigs tipped with shiners, tapping the sinker on and off bottom. The tips of underwater structures, and irregularities along the drop off to deeper water, tend to concentrate fish.

As summer arrives in earnest, expect some walleyes to drop deeper, down to as much as 35 or 40 feet. Not all, however; some linger along the deep outer edges of main lake weed beds, where trolling a bullet sinker/spinner rig tipped with a nightcrawler covers water, using speed and flash as added triggers to catch fish. Try a similar rig on a heavy (2- to 3- ounce) bottom bouncer or three-way rig for fishing deeper if needed. If the fish are finicky, however, switch to a 3-ounce bottom bouncer rig, using a curved “Slow Death” hook, to fish slowly, tapping the wire feeler of the bouncer on and off bottom while the baited hook flip flops and spins a half-crawler threaded onto the bent hook, tempting reluctant biters to respond.

By fall, Vermilion walleyes may drop even deeper, with 40 feet plus not unusual. Beefing up your jig size to ½-ounce or so and tipping with a minnow, or vertically jigging a # 7 or #9 Jigging Rapala does the trick. Be sure to tie a barrel swivel into your line about 16-18 inches above the Jigging Rapala to eliminate line twist. Caution: Walleyes caught this deep may not be releasable; if the fish are stressed, keep just enough for a meal if desired, and then switch to fishing for alternative species. We have lots of ‘them!

Muskies;

Muskies are targeted by the most hardcore of our angling clients, willing to put in long hours casting large lures to trigger follows and provoke strikes. We’re pleased to say that Vermilion’s Muskie population ranks among the best in the state for both numbers and size, with extremely large fish available. In other words, this is the place to come not just to get bit, but for a good shot at a giant.

Unlike pike, muskies do not spawn at ice-out in the back ends of marshy bays. Rather, they’re more likely to spawn in 5 feet or so of water atop weed growth in the back-center portions of bays, with water temperatures in the mid-50 Fs. For the first few weeks of the season, tossing small bucktails in bays and along shorelines leading back into the main lake are perhaps your top options.

Once summer arrives, muskies are likely to be found according to two primary patterns—weeds or rocks—and not necessarily at the same time. Often, one excels over the other. Thus, when you come to Vermilion, spend some time casting and looking at areas with large main lake weed beds along shorelines or around islands, and at rock-and-boulder reefs and island complexes with immediate access to deep water. Often, your first morning of fishing will reveal enough follows by curious fish to indicate whether weeds or rocks with be the focus of your fishing the next few days.

As far as which lures to use, that’s where your personal preferences and the fish’s current interests coincide. Large bucktails, giant crankbaits, top waters, magnum soft baits, classic jerk baits—they all have excellent potential. The best bet is to experiment with all lure styles in different color patterns, and see if the fish indicate a preference by following or striking.

As curious fish that like to suspend near the surface, muskies routinely follow your lures to the boat, even when not necessarily active. A fish following 5 feet behind your lure may not bite, while one nipping at the strands of your bucktail may be triggered at the last second by a figure 8 maneuver at boat side. Regardless, once you’ve spotted fish in certain areas, punch in the coordinates on your GPS, and return to the spot several times during the day to try to intercept them when they are actively feeding. Low light levels at dusk and dawn, and especially approaching storm fronts (safety first—avoid lightning!) often turn passive followers into savage biters. MUSKIES

NORTHERN PIKE;

Vermilion’s deep waters, lush weed beds and plentiful forage base grow northern pike to huge proportions. Few places in the state rival our potential to grow pike surpassing the 20-pound mark. Plus, there are loads of pike in the 10- to 20-pound range, and plenty of smaller fish that make a good alternative shore lunch if you fillet out their Y bones prior to cooking.

As mentioned earlier, pike are already spawning in the back ends of marshy bays even as the ice goes out. For the first month or so of the season, they will periodically move in and out of these bays, either feeding on ciscoes suspended outside the bay mouths, or on miscellaneous smaller fish within the backs of bays themselves.

Early on, fairly slow retrieves with ½-ounce spinnerbaits, 4-inch spoons, large crankbaits (both suspending and floating-diving), large unweighted soft baits, and fly fishing excel for both numbers and giants in the shallow back ends of bays. As the water warms, add a bit of action to your retrieves. Example: When using spoons, interrupt the retrieve 2 or 3 times per cast by popping your rod tip upward, and then letting the lure flutter down for a few seconds to trigger strikes from following pike.

By late spring and early summer, the largest pike will be spending more time on main lake weed flats and shallow rock bars adjacent to the deepest main lake basin. Casting many of the same lures as used earlier excels for fish of all sizes.

Once the water temperature reaches about 70 F, the largest pike tend to drop down into deep water (35-40 feet) to escape uncomfortably warm temperatures. Here, they feed on ciscoes and whitefish. To catch them, vertically jig a 1- to 2-ounce white jig tipped with a large white soft bait, up and down near bottom, anywhere you see large fish on your depth finder. The tips of long point and edges of main lake reefs are great spots. Also try longline trolling very deep-diving large crankbaits that reach down to the 35-foot level.

At the end of summer, cooling water temperatures draw big pike shallow again, up into main lake weed beds and onto rock points and reefs, where either casting or longline trolling large lures produces big fish.

CRAPPIES;

Visiting anglers are often surprised at the caliber of our crappie population, where limits of slab crappies are the rule, rather than the exception. Fish pushing the 1 ½- to 2-pound mark are common amongst your catch. Crappies also are delicious, providing a tasty alternative to walleyes when they hit the frying pan.

In spring, crappies move into shallow bay areas where flooded wood and reeds are present. Early on, flooded trees are usually the best fish attractors, since weed cover mashed flat by recent ice offers little protection for spooky crappies. Set up a cast length away from such cover, and pitch a small 1/32-ounce jig about 16 inches below a thin balsa float up near the edge of the cover. Let it dangle awhile, occasionally twitching the bait to entice fish to move out to the edges of the cover.

As water temperatures rise into the 50 Fs, many crappies will shift to reed cover for eventual spawning purposes, but not just any reeds will do. Cruise the outer edges of reedbeds on calm, sunny days, peering into the water with polarized sunglasses. You’re looking for areas with a combination of bent and broken reeds, darker bottom, and the dark profiles of crappies lurking within the cover. Once found, back off a short distance, and cast similar jig and bobber combos as used earlier into pockets, lanes and edges of the reeds. Switch to a slip float for fish that are deeper than about 3 ½ feet, which is a more snag-resistant setup than a traditional float. Similar to large mouths, once fish are hooked, quickly lift them up and outside the cover, then fight them adjacent to it so they can’t tangle and break off your line in the reeds.

Spawning usually takes place with water temperatures around 60 F. Once crappies disperse from spawning sites, they begin to school and suspend along points at or near the mouths, typically somewhere from 10 to 20 feet beneath the surface. Don’t fish on the bottom at this time, or you’ll be below the fish. Instead, when you seed suspended fish on your electronics, cast a 1/16-ounce jig out across the school, and count it down, one thousand, two thousand, three thousand, etc.; the small jig sinks about 1 foot per second, and you want it to reach a level at or just above the top of the school. Then retrieve it back slowly and steadily, with minimal action, enticing fish to rise up and smack it. Done properly, you can quickly limit out on bunches of slab-sided crappies. On 4-pound-test and medium-light tackle, they provide a good tussle and loads of fun for the family and serious anglers alike.

In fall, crappies continue using many of the same areas as in summer, but tend to drop close to the bottom, forming huge mega- schools with hundreds of fish in perhaps 30 to 40 feet of water. Vertically fish an 1/8-ounce jig, touching it on and off bottom, or just about the fish’s level if they appear a few feet off bottom on your electronics

LAKE TROUT;

Lake trout are not present in Lake Vermilion, although you can take a short rail portage into Trout Lake to get in on a Laker and walleye action, with a good chance of catching big fish of both species.

In early spring, lake trout roam main lake shorelines, remaining fairly shallow—often 15 feet or less—until the surface water temperature rises to about 55 F. Simply longline troll large wobbling spoons or magnum crankbaits along shore and around the perimeters of mid lake islands that drop off into adjacent deep water. Add a 1- to 2-ounce Rubber core sinker to your line about 4 feet ahead of the lure if you think you need to fish a little deeper to trigger strikes.

Once the water warms sufficiently, Lakers head for the depths, preferring the colder water available in 40, 60, even 80 feet or more. Thus, summer trout fishing requires tactics allowing you to fish extra deep.

Vertically jigging 1-ounce white jigs tipped with large white soft bait tails is perhaps the easiest method to employ. Free spool the lure to bottom, engage the reel, and then bounce the lure up and down a few times. Reel up 8 to 10 feet, and repeat. Again. Lake trout notoriously follow lures up off the bottom to strike midway between the surface and the bottom—or even as you lift your lure out of the water next to the boat!

Or, try three-way rigging a flutter spoon or large minnow bait on a 5-foot leader, with a 3-foot dropper line off your three-way swivel to a 5- to 8-ounce weight. Troll along just fast enough to wobble the lure, lift-dropping the sinker on and off bottom to make sure you’re in the fish zone. You can experiment with additional trolling hardware like downriggers or Dipsy Divers to troll your lures deep, but they are seldom required.

Please click on link for additional information, Thank You.

https://www.fishingstage.com/compose-post-screen?topicnum=40002&rpostnum=487287&quote=true

Ron620DVS🎣🐟🐠🐸🦞

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Jul 21, 2021 15:48:01   #
Ron620DVS Loc: Guntersville Alabama
 
Tom Wasz wrote:
I'm going to L.V. for the first time and staying at Spring Bay resort and was wondering if anyone could tell me the best areas to fish. We will be targeting Bass and Crappie/panfish. I not asking for honey holes just an area. I wouldn't be adverse to trailering to another part of the lake if it was smarter to drive the road instead of the water. Also are there any restaurants in the close vicinity to Cook. Will be there from August 7 - 14th, this year.

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Please click on links for additional information, Thank You


Where you can catch Crappie in Lake Vermilion.


Early in the season Crappies seek the warmest water they can find. This warmer water is found on the "South Facing Shorelines". I prefer shorelines that have some shallow water structure. Emerging vegetation, trees, and boulders will all provide cover.


CRAPPIE FISHING:

Anyone that has ever fished with me knows that I have a passion for crappie fishing. They are a challenge to locate on a regular basis and once located can be a lot of fun to catch for all the members of your family. I almost forgot… they are delicious!

On any given year our best crappie bite is when the surface temperature is about 62 degrees F. These temperatures can occur from about May first through the middle of June. I know that this is not very specific and this is not an overgeneralization. Lake Vermilion is a very large lake with many bays and channels. The water depth and clarity varies in these bays and channels; therefore, the bite will also vary. Initially the crappies will be the most active in the shallower areas with stained water (i.e. Black Bay) and then working out to the deeper and clearer waters.

Sometimes crappie fanatics try to time the bite on any given body of water. The odds are usually against timing the bite exactly. Lake Vermilion is the perfect lake for the serious crappie and panfish anglers because it is actually many lakes in one and the exact timing of the bite is not that critical. Once the water warms above 62 degrees, the crappies are usually harder to locate. They can still be found; however, most anglers turn their attention to other species during this time.

Early in the season crappies seek the warmest water they can find. This warmer water is found on the south facing shorelines. I prefer shorelines that have some shallow water structure. Emerging vegetation, trees, and boulders will all provide cover. Shallow water with gravel and small rock will provide spawning beds.

I have been a guide for more years than I want to admit. Every year I search for the elusive Black Crappie and every year I locate them in different areas. The search is endless. This is one of the reasons I enjoy fishing for these paper-mouthed slabs.

I like to use light-medium to light action rod with 4 lb. test mono for Crappies. To this combo I will use a slip bobber with a tiny jig. This method will allow me to fish all water levels. Jig size should be from 1/8 oz. to 1/64oz. Usually I like to work from large to small depending on fishing conditions. The jig may be feathered or plain. On a plain jig I like to attach some creature (plastic tail) or critter (minnow, wax worm, etc.). Color is always the $64,000 question. I will always start out with some light color and move to the darker shades. Every year I get out-fished by one of my clients that bring some ridiculous color and shaped jig that they got in some 25-cent grab bag. My best advice to anyone is to be very flexible with the size and color until you can establish some pattern.

Please click on link for additional information, Thank You.

https://www.pehrsonlodge.com/minnesota-crappie-fishing


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LAKE VERMILION PANFISH REPORT – 2 TACTICS FOR SUCCESS:


Here’s something a little different, a Lake Vermilion panfish report.

We all love walleye fishing and Lake Vermilion is one of the best walleye fisheries in the state of Minnesota, but don’t sleep on the panfish bite. It can be boatload of action and they make for some excellent table fair.

In his report, local guide Billy Rosner shares a couple of his favorite tactics for putting north country panfish in the boat with both finesse and power fishing presentations. Here’s his report for this week:

“It’s definitely shaping up to be a really hot summer up here on Lake Vermilion. The water temperatures are skyrocketing.

“Vermilion is known for it’s walleye and it’s muskies, but there’s also some really quality panfish in Vermilion, both bluegills and crappies. You can go about them your traditional ways, using slip-bobbers and a livebait. A fun way to do it – and this is where your electronics come in – is getting out into that open water and locating big schools of crappies. Cast these Rapala Shad Dancers into those areas. They dive really quick with that big long bill, and they’ll get down deep really fast. You can even long-line troll through them with the same bait.

“Another popular way to catch them is drop-shotting. You’ve all heard of drop-shotting for bass. Well, it’s starting to be a really good technique for even walleye and it’s very effective for panfish, too. Give that a shot. There’s some really good info on AnglingBuzz.com on the drop-shotting methods for panfish – it’s just a really fun way to get into some really quality panfish on Lake Vermilion.

“Have a great week and be safe out there!

There you have it, a mid-July Lake Vermilion panfish report. Make sure to check back again next week for another report from Lake Vermilion. Billy Rosner will be sharing new report every single week throughout the entire summer, so if you’ve got plans to head up to Vermilion for a fishing trip this summer, you can keep up-to-date with the bite throughout the weeks leading up to your visit.

Hopefully these tips help you put a few more fish in the boat this week!


https://anglingbuzz.com/lake-vermilion-panfish-report-2-tactics-for-success/


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Know the Territory:


Lake Vermilion is massive. With 365 islands, 341 miles of shoreline and depths up to 76 feet, there's a lot of water to cover in search of fish. A detailed topographic map of the lake is a huge help if you're new here, and if you're fishing by boat, sonar and GPS also come in handy. The lake is rich in fish-attracting structure, and anglers often find success targeting rocky shoals, reefs and drop-offs, or by casting along the rocky shorelines of the lake's many bays and islands.

Pike Bay is a perennial spring hot spot, especially for walleye, which spawn in its shallow waters. Nearby Stuntz Bay and Everett Bay can be productive at this time as well. In general, look for transitional areas, including rocky drop-offs, places where a gravel bottom changes to mud and the edges of weed beds. These areas are prime spots for walleye, as well as muskellunge and bass.

Time it Right:


The best time to be on Lake Vermilion depends on what you plan to catch, but timing is always important. Walleye are the prime target for many anglers who visit the lake, and the months of May and June are arguably the best time to catch them as they move toward shallow bays to feed and spawn. Walleye typically disperse throughout deeper water in summer, but the fall months offer excellent fishing as well, especially in narrows and around the mouths of bays.

Much like walleye, the best times to catch northern pike are spring and fall. Muskellunge season doesn't open until early June, and the best chance to catch them is shortly after the season opener. Muskies become more difficult to catch as the summer progresses. There are excellent bass fishing opportunities year-round, but late spring and early summer are arguably the best.

Know the Rules:


A current Minnesota fishing license is required to fish Lake Vermilion. Licenses are available online through the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) website, as well as at numerous locations across the state. Most bait shops, sporting goods stores and outfitters in the Lake Vermilion area sell fishing licenses, as do many convenience stores, hardware stores and Walmart locations.

As with all lakes in Minnesota, fishing regulations are strictly enforced on Lake Vermilion. Season dates, catch limits and size restrictions are subject to change, so check with the Minnesota DNR for up-to-date regulations. The DNR publishes an annual fishing regulations guide that is available online and in print form at most places where fishing licenses are sold.

Take Your Time:

Exploring Lake Vermilion in a day, or even a weekend, is an impossible task. Like any lake, getting to the water takes time and is often the key to success when it comes to fishing. For an extended trip, camping for tents and RVs is available at Lake Vermilion-Soudan Underground Mine State Park on the lake's south shore. The park also offers fishing access and boat-launch facilities. Portions of the more remote northern shore are accessible through Superior National Forest.

Lake Vermilion's shoreline is also dotted with lodges and resorts, most of which offer on-site bait and tackle sales, boat rentals and launch facilities, in addition to accommodations. Numerous experienced fishing guides also offer their services on Lake Vermilion, and some resorts offer the option of lining up a fishing guide for you as part of an overall package.



https://traveltips.usatoday.com/fishing-tips-lake-vermilion-minnesota-2542.html



Ron620DVS🎣🐟🐠🐸🦞


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Jul 21, 2021 16:07:44   #
Ron620DVS Loc: Guntersville Alabama
 
Tom Wasz wrote:
I'm going to L.V. for the first time and staying at Spring Bay resort and was wondering if anyone could tell me the best areas to fish. We will be targeting Bass and Crappie/panfish. I not asking for honey holes just an area. I wouldn't be adverse to trailering to another part of the lake if it was smarter to drive the road instead of the water. Also are there any restaurants in the close vicinity to Cook. Will be there from August 7 - 14th, this year.


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LAKE VERMILION BUZZ BITE REPORT 6-2-2021:


Lake Vermilion is starting to heat up and so is the fishing.

Depending on where you are on the lake, water temperatures are in the high fifties and low sixties.

There is currently a solid crappie bite up in shallow water as these fish are spawning.

Try using small crappie tubes or crappie minnows under a float for the best results.

Crappies on Lake Vermillion are doing most of their spawning in the reeds and shallow bays.

Most of the crappies are in water that is three to eight feet deep.

When targeting the spawning panfish, try to keep some of the smaller fish in that nine to eleven inch range and release some of those bigger fish to help protect the resource.

You will also find pike cruising around the panfish spawning areas.

They can be caught on a number of baits but some of the better baits have been Terminator Spinnerbaits or a number four Blue Fox Inline Spinner.

Some of the smallmouth bass population has started to spawn while others are just on the verge of spawning.

Those fish can be caught with Ned rigs, drop shots, crank baits and jerk baits.

The walleye bite on Lake Vermilion has been a little tougher, as they are really on the move this time of year.

One day you will find a big school on a main lake point and the next day they are gone.

You just have to stay mobile and really utilize your electronics.

You don’t want to start fishing an area until you mark a few fish.

Most of the walleyes are in the fifteen to eighteen foot depth range, generally right off that first break.

Live bait rigs or a jig and a minnow are going to be your best bait options.

Pretty soon those walleyes will be making there move towards their early summer structure.

Good luck out on Lake Vermilion!


Please click on link for additional information, Thank You.


https://anglingbuzz.com/lake-vermilion-buzz-bite-report-6-27-2021/



Ron620DVS🎣🐟🐠🐸🦞


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