Fishing Stage - Fishing Forum
Savannah Georgia Fishing in Winter
Jan 13, 2021 14:38:24   #
John Stier Loc: Savannah, GA
 
My name's John. I've been here in the Savannah area for a few years. I'm looking for advice for fishing saltwater in the winter. Freshwater is my thing, but I'm a transplanted northerner that remembers the surf and backwater days that were amazing in the cold. Any advice would be much appreciated!



| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 14:57:31   #
flyguy Loc: So. Padre Island, TX. 1 & 2, & S.E. MN. 3-12
 
John Stier wrote:
My name's John. I've been here in the Savannah area for a few years. I'm looking for advice for fishing saltwater in the winter. Freshwater is my thing, but I'm a transplanted northerner that remembers the surf and backwater days that were amazing in the cold. Any advice would be much appreciated!


Welcome to the Forum, John. That looks to be a very nice Red Snapper, was it in season, could you keep it? If you have been salt fishing for two years, you have found out the things slow down during the winter months. If the water temp. gets below 55* trout may die, along with other fish, but the trout are most susceptible to cold water temps. The fish simply will not waste any energy to chase a bait. (MHO)

| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 15:05:13   #
John Stier Loc: Savannah, GA
 
Not in season. Let her go.

| Reply
 
 
Jan 13, 2021 15:07:55   #
John Stier Loc: Savannah, GA
 
She's my best from last season



| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 15:13:14   #
flyguy Loc: So. Padre Island, TX. 1 & 2, & S.E. MN. 3-12
 
John Stier wrote:
She's my best from last season


I wonder how many make or end up being shark/dolphin bait.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 15:21:23   #
greentime Loc: tampa bay, florida
 
that must have been a fun catch. my smoker would love me if I could pull one of those out of the gulf in my area of florida someday :).

| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 16:47:56   #
John Stier Loc: Savannah, GA
 
That's an Atlantic Red my friend. 1 per person. We always bring in 20 plus per, on a six man.

| Reply
 
 
Jan 13, 2021 16:49:27   #
John Stier Loc: Savannah, GA
 
On my trips none. We do it right. One per and always make sure they go back down. I respect the species and my captain.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 16:56:26   #
bknecht Loc: Northeast pa
 
First of all, welcome, secondly, doesn’t look like you need much saltwater advice from the looks of those pictures

| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 17:29:39   #
Fredfish Loc: Prospect CT.
 
John Stier wrote:
My name's John. I've been here in the Savannah area for a few years. I'm looking for advice for fishing saltwater in the winter. Freshwater is my thing, but I'm a transplanted northerner that remembers the surf and backwater days that were amazing in the cold. Any advice would be much appreciated!


Welcome to the Stage John, and those are a he!! of a pair of intro fish! Looks like you could be giving us advice. Good luck and Tight Lines!

| Reply
Jan 13, 2021 18:13:53   #
Lee626 Loc: Brick NJ [ near the Jersey shore ]
 
Welcome John, some nice fish you got there, don't know much about fishin down Georgia way but it looks like your doing pretty good.

| Reply
 
 
Jan 15, 2021 06:43:33   #
FixorFish Loc: SW Oregon
 
flyguy wrote:
Welcome to the Forum, John. That looks to be a very nice Red Snapper, was it in season, could you keep it? If you have been salt fishing for two years, you have found out the things slow down during the winter months. If the water temp. gets below 55* trout may die, along with other fish, but the trout are most susceptible to cold water temps. The fish simply will not waste any energy to chase a bait. (MHO)


Hehehe.... I'm not sure if you misspoke, or were thinking of another species, or just what, when you uttered such a ridiculous statement.... that trout "suffer" in water less than 55° !!!
We have water in Oregon that barely MAKES it to 55° by August !
Simply ludicrous statement, sorry to be so harsh about it, but , come on.
If trout had a problem with low temps, why is that the target fish....multiple species, btw..... that constitutes pretty all Oregonian ice fishing ?
Possibly you have a "less than hardy" species, but we have LOTS of trout that, while a bit less energetic....still gotta eat and certainly don't mind the cold water (duh !!??.... it's where you found 'em, down deep, in July, didn't you ?)
Just cannot wrap my head around that statement, Fly. Love to hear yours or anyone else's thoughts on trout's demise at, and suceptability to, temps below 55°. This would certainly be useful info that I have never heard before.

| Reply
Jan 15, 2021 15:49:34   #
John Stier Loc: Savannah, GA
 
The reply was to saltwater trout/ speckled trout. Totally different type of barometer when it comes to them. Please have respect and knowledge before you down someone.

| Reply
Jan 15, 2021 17:42:36   #
FixorFish Loc: SW Oregon
 
John Stier wrote:
The reply was to saltwater trout/ speckled trout. Totally different type of barometer when it comes to them. Please have respect and knowledge before you down someone.


You are quite correct, since I somehow missed that the statement was referring to SALT, it was not necessarily made abundantly clear, utilizing the species identification misnomer.
I suppose I should offer apology, however... not actually TROUT, now are they ? If you choose to call something (a drum species)a name, colloquially, that is not correct taxonomically, isn't really my fault. We can argue semantics all day, but "specs & spots", are not, have never been, never will be ...a trout, regardless of "tradition" or desire to call 'em that.
I stand by my statement.... TROUT are not cold-water wimps......and despite the defensive protestations to the contrary, you caught a drum species.....call a spade a spade, then your thin-skinned reply will have relevance, rather than being capitulation or an attempt to coerce others to embrace your misled vernacular.

| Reply
Jan 16, 2021 10:11:52   #
greentime Loc: tampa bay, florida
 
post from the beginning to end was about saltwater fishing and at least I clearly understood what type of "trout" he was referring to regardless of terminology but it's easy to see how you got confused. Either way, more respectful questioning of his statement and less insulting of a person will usually produce better communication results, no matter how thick someone's skin might be ;).

| Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
FishingStage.com - Forum
Copyright 2018-2021 IDF International Technologies, Inc.